Tuesday, May 28, 2024

Ugly Richard Dreyfuss

If you missed it, the continual nightmare that is Richard Dreyfuss had a public meltdown where he attacked trans gendered people and women and people of color and so much more. People were apparently present to celebrate the film JAWS and instead got the nutso ravings from a garbage man whose career has been useless for decades.

JAWS was a good popcorn flick and would have been one with or without Dreyfuss.  I think he's probably a good part of the success of CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND, however.  That said, he ran movie goers off from THE GOODBYE GIRL -- "I don't like the pantyhose hanging from the shower" -- or whatever his stupid line was.  Back in the 70s, a 'meme' would have been a radio mockery and dainty, effete prisspot Dreyfuss was mocked constantly. 

For a brief period, he was supposed to be a film star.  But he really wasn't.

Those three films were followed by one box office failure after another: THE BIG FIX, THE COMPETITION, WHOSE LIFE IS IT ANYWAY?, THE BUDDY SYSTEM -- and then he appears in a minor hit DOWN AND OUT IN BEVERLY HILLS (which was Nick Notle's film -- not Dreyfuss and not Bette Midler) and that's pretty much it for him as a lead actor.  STAKEOUT?  An embarrassing film that Emilio walks off with and that only made $65 million and, by the late 80s, that really wasn't a hit. NUTS wasn't a hit (he insulted Barbra Streisand in his remarks as well, by the way).  MOON OVER PARADOR, LET IT RIDE, ALWAYS, ONCE AROUND . . .

His leading man career died in the 80s.  Now his image is dead as well.

 

Closing with C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot:"

 

Tuesday, May 28, 2024.  Another horrific act carried out by the Israeli government in Gaza but the pushback is so strong accountability might finally emerge.

The Israeli government's slaughter of Gaza gets worse every day and that's certainly true of actions over the weekend. 



That's a report from THE GUARDIAN of protests taking place today.  


If you thought the actions of the Israeli government couldn't get more outrageous, you were wrong as one action on Sunday demonstrated.  MINT noted, "An Israeli airstrike on Sunday hit a refugee camp for displaced people in Gaza killing at least 35 people, mostly women and children, and injuring dozens more, CNN reported citing Palestinian Ministry of Health."  That's disgusting.   Neri Zilber (FINANCIAL TIMES OF LONDON) observes that the Israeli government attempted to insist they struck a terrorist camp.  They might have stuck with that were it not for footage and witnesses and some press pushback.  Holly Evans, Namita Singh and Bel Trew (INDEPENDENT) report:


The charity ActionAid said its activists witnessed the attack, which it described as an “inhumane and barbaric act”. “We are outraged and heartbroken by the recent attacks in west Rafah, where Israeli fighter jets launched eight missiles at makeshift shelters housing internally displaced persons (IDPs) next to UNRWA warehouses stocking vital aid,” the charity said in a statement.

“These shelters were supposed to be safe havens for innocent civilians, yet they became targets of brutal violence. Children, women, and men are being burned alive under their tents and shelters.”

People staying at the camp described the “terrifying” scenes as the strike unfolded.

Eklas, 27, who is originally from north Gaza, said: “People died from the fire. People did not know where to run. The fire broke out in the tents. The bodies were burned. I wanted to flee from Rafah to Khan Yunis, but I did not have the money for transportation.

“It terrified us all, more than one explosion shook the place. We do not know whether to leave the camp now or whether to stay. We couldn’t sleep last night due to fear, horror, and anxiety.”



Doha Madani (NBC NEWS) quotes the Red Crescent Society stating, "It is important to note that this location was designated by the Israeli occupation as a humanitarian area, and citizens were coerced into evacuating to it."  Citing the UK's Action Aid,  ABC NEWS reveals, "The death toll in the IDF airstrike that hit western Rafa Sunday night has risen to at least 50 individuals, including civilians."  CNN adds:


Gaza's Health Ministry said those killed and wounded in the strike were mostly women and children. Video obtained by CNN shows tent-like structures on fire. The Palestinian Authority presidency urged the international community to intervene immediately. Hamas described the attack as a "massacre" and said it holds the US administration and President Joe Biden personally accountable. Doctors Without Borders (MSF) expressed horror following the airstrike, saying it "shows once again that nowhere is safe."  


Australia's ABC NEWS reminds, "The strike came two days after the International Court of Justice ordered Israel to end its military offensive in Rafah, where more than half of Gaza's population had sought shelter before Israel's recent incursion. Tens of thousands of people remain in the area while many others have fled."  And it comes as Amnesty International is asking for probes of other recent strikes.   THE NATIONAL reports:


Amnesty International has urged the International Criminal Court to investigate as war crimes three recent Israeli strikes that killed 44 Palestinian civilians, including 32 children.

Last week, the prosecutor of the ICC, Karim Khan, applied for arrest warrants against Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and top Hamas leaders on suspicion of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Amnesty said three Israeli strikes one on Al Maghazi refugee camp, in central Gaza, on April 16 and two on Rafah, in southern Gaza, on April 19 and 20 are "further evidence of a broader pattern of war crimes" committed by the Israeli military in Gaza.

"The cases documented here illustrate a clear pattern of attacks over the past seven months in which the Israeli military has flouted international law, killing Palestinian civilians with total impunity and displaying a callous disregard for human lives," said Erika Guevara-Rosas, senior director at Amnesty.



  International rights groups and leaders who for months have demanded a cease-fire in Gaza expressed renewed horror as images emerged from Israel's Sunday bombing of a tent camp that had been set up by forcibly displaced Palestinians in Rafah, with women and children making up the majority of the 45 people who were reportedly killed in the attack.

Emergency workers toldNBC News that the death toll was likely to rise, as many people had been trapped in the encampment as it was engulfed in flames.

NBC reported that the strike took place less than a mile away from a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) medical facility, where at least 180 injured people arrived on Sunday.

"We are horrified by this deadly event, which shows once again that nowhere is safe," said MSF on social media.

Muhammad Al-Mughir, a spokesperson for the Palestinian Civil Defense, told NBC that the Tal al-Sultan neighborhood that was attacked had been designated a "humanitarian area" in Rafah, from which more than 800,000 people have been forcibly displaced this month as Israel has launched a ground invasion. More than 1 million people have been forced to flee to Rafah since October, when Israel began its siege in Gaza.

The bombing came two days after the International Court of Justice issued its latest order to Israel regarding its assault on Gaza, telling the government that it "must immediately halt its military offensive or any other action in the Rafah governorate" and that the ICJ was not convinced by Israel's claims that it was taking steps to protect civilians. 


Daniel Hurst (GUARDIAN) reports that Doctors Without Borders is demanding action:
 
The global president of Médecins Sans Frontières has urged Australia to impose sanctions on the Israeli government, saying he has “run out of words” to describe the suffering of Palestinians in Gaza and the collapse of the health system.

Dr Christos Christou is due to meet the Australian foreign minister, Penny Wong, on Wednesday to request “immediate, concrete actions to hold Israel to account” for its conduct during the war.

“Australia must apply appropriate sanctions on Israel, as it would to any other global state that refuses to comply with UN security council resolutions,” Christou told the National Press Club in Canberra on Tuesday.


 Christou said Israel was conducting an “indiscriminate and disproportionate military campaign” and “pursuing a policy of deliberate deprivation, only allowing a trickle of food and water to enter Gaza”.

Let's take a pause here for a moment.  Doctors Without Borders is calling for action from the Australian government.  Hmm.  I'm not a citizen of Australia.  But if I were and I was Tweeting multiple times a day, you can be sure that would be all over my feed and you can be sure I'd be writing about it and calling out my government of Australia.  I call out the US government all the time.  I've called out White House occupant Bully Boy Bush and presidents Barack Obama, Donald Trump and Joe Biden here and never did so in a weak manner.  

That's why you need to avoid fake asses like Caitlin Johnstone.  So strong, so vocal . . . when it comes to US or UK leaders.  But she doesn't live in either.  She lives in Australia, she's a citizen there.  Excuse me, she's a coward there.  She's failed to her own government accountable over and over.  She didn't trash them for their refusal to stand up to the UK over Julian Assange.  She never holds them accountable because she's a scared, little coward.

That's a big story, Doctors Without Borders taking that stand.  But Caitlin's in hiding yet again.  Oh, she's still Tweeting.  Useless garbage.

And trying to round up votes for Donald Trump.

That's right:

The thing about claiming Trump would be worse on Gaza is that you don't even know that's true. It's a completely baseless and unfalsifiable assertion. Biden's adamant refusal to put up any resistance at all to Israeli insanity is such a drastic deviation from the norm for US presidents that it's entirely possible replacing him with almost anyone would be an improvement.

We don't link to trash.  And she'll claim that she's being misunderstood and there's more to her words.  

Yes, if you click "more" you can read more.  Why you would I don't know.  But she needs to just sit her tired ass down and lefties in the US need to stop promoting her.  She's not our ally.  Do you grasp that yet, Heidi Boghosian?  Stop pimping this piece of trash.

If you did click "more" you'll find her writing of how people don't know that Trump would be worse for Gaza.

That's so sad.  She's physically repulsive, she's a coward and, it turns out, she's also stupid.  I don't have time to spoonfeed the willfully ignorant so I'll just note one example that demonstrates she's yet again talking out of her ass: December 5, 2017.  Go see what Donald did that day and then play the game of pretense that Caitlin wants to play.  Only a fool, only a damn fool, would go along with her nonsense.  

She's not left.  She's not a friend of the left.  She is promoting false equivalencies and doing what the corporate media did in the leadup to the 2016 election: Normalizing Donald Trump.  It's time for US lefties to stop promoting her.


Back to Gaza.  As the truth was repeated more and more, the Israeli government moved over to the claim that it was a mistake.  Doha Madani and Chantal Da Silva (NBC NEWS) explain:

The strike drew condemnation from world leaders just days after the United Nations' top court ordered Israel to halt its offensive on the southern Gaza city, where more than a million people had sought refuge.

In an address to the Knesset on Monday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called the strike “a tragic incident," his office said, clarifying comments made in Hebrew that could be translated in English as either “a tragic mishap” or “a tragic mistake.”

“We are investigating the case and will draw conclusions, because this is our policy," he said. 


Another investigation where the government investigates its own actions?  We've seen this before repeatedly since October 7th and know how this ends.   As the Israeli government attempts to pretend it's nothing unusual, others don't rush to agree.  BBC's Paul Adams,Matt Murphy report:

The UN Security Council will hold an emergency meeting on Tuesday, at Algeria's request, to discuss the Rafah strike.

In a statement on Monday, UN secretary general António Guterres said the strike had "killed scores of innocent civilians who were only seeking shelter from this deadly conflict".

"There is no safe place in Gaza. This horror must stop," he said





We have said repeatedly that no place is safe in Gaza. Not shelters. Not hospitals. Not the so-called humanitarian zones. 

We have also warned that a military operation in Rafah would lead to a slaughter. 

We’ve seen the consequences in last night’s utterly unacceptable attack. 

Whether the attack was a war crime or a “tragic mistake,” for the people of Gaza, there is no debate. What happened last night was the latest – and possibly most cruel – abomination. 

To call it “a mistake” is a message that means nothing for those killed, those grieving, and those trying to save lives.


It was not a mistake.  It was a miscalculation on the part of the Israeli government which thought it could get away with it.  Of course, it would think that, it's gotten away with so much in the last months.  But times are changing.  CNN notes:

A growing list of countries, world leaders and aid agencies have now condemned the strike, saying "there is no safe space in Gaza."

Here are some of the international reactions:

  • "Horror must stop": UN chief Antònio Guterres issued a blistering condemnation. "There is no safe place in Gaza. This horror must stop," he said. The UN Security Council will hold an emergency meeting to discuss the strike on Tuesday, according to a UN diplomat.
  • "Abomination": UN relief chief Martin Griffiths criticized Netanyahu's response to the attack. "Whether the attack was a war crime or a 'tragic error' for the people of Gaza, there is no debate. What happened last night was the latest – and possibly most cruel – abomination," Griffiths said.
  • "Unbearable": French President Emmanuel Macron said he was "outraged" by the strikes and called for a ceasefire. Germany described the "images of charred bodies, including children, from the airstrike" as "unbearable." The European Union’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell, said Israel must implement the ICJ ruling. Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan called the strike a "massacre" and said his country “will do everything” in its power to hold Israeli officials accountable.
  • "Heartbreaking": A US National Security Council spokesperson said the strike was “heartbreaking," adding that the United States was “actively engaging” with officials in Israel to determine what happened. The spokesperson also said "Israel has a right to go after Hamas, and we understand this strike killed two senior Hamas terrorists who are responsible for attacks against Israeli civilians."
  • "Complete disregard for the lives of civilians": Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières) strongly denounced the strike and called for an "immediate and sustained ceasefire" in Gaza. MSF said the airstrike on the camp "shows the complete disregard for the lives of civilians." MSF nurse activity manager Gaia Giletta said from Gaza that "we are shocked by the continuous attacks on civilians, and we have no words to describe the horror of what we've seen here."
  • "Hell on earth": “The images from last night are a testament to how Rafah has turned into hell on earth," said Philippe Lazzarini, the Commissioner-General of the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA). The scenes from Rafah last night are harrowing, Lazzarini said, and some victims “were reportedly burnt to death."
  • Strike could hinder hostage talks: Qatar said Israel’s strike on the Rafah camp could “hinder” negotiations aiming for the release of hostages and reaching a ceasefire in Gaza. The Qatari foreign ministry said the strike is a “serious violation of international laws” and expressed concern that it “would complicate the ongoing mediation efforts.”
 
MINT notes reactions as well:


The attack triggered a global outrage against Israel. A US National Security Council spokesperson said Israel "must take every precaution possible to protect civilians".

Egypt condemned the "targeting of defenceless civilians", calling it part of "a systematic policy aimed at widening the scope of death and destruction in the Gaza Strip to make it uninhabitable".

Jordan accused Israel of "ongoing war crimes", Saudi Arabia condemned "the continued massacres", and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan vowed "to hold these barbarians and murderers accountable".

Qatar condemned a "dangerous violation of international law" and voiced "concern that the bombing will complicate ongoing mediation efforts" towards a truce.


Everyone waits to see what Joe Biden's reaction will be.  He has looked the other way for months while turning over billions of US tax dollars to the Israeli government.  He has looked the other way while arming the Israeli government.  He has invoked supposed "red lines" that never have any actual meaning.  He is losing support among the youth, among African-Americans and among Arab Americans and the November presidential election looms.  Is he going to do the right thing or continue to support and take part in a genocide?


This latest atrocity has the Biden administration’s fingerprints all over it. The IDF’s onslaught on Rafah has proceeded over the past three weeks after the White House gave it the green light. Just two weeks before Israel attacked Rafah, Biden signed a supplementary military assistance bill passed with bipartisan support that included $26 billion in funding for Israel.

Biden has asserted that Israel is doing “all it can to ensure civilian protection,” while National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan insisted that the IDF’s assault has “not involved major military operations into the heart of dense urban areas.” This line has been maintained even as over 800,000 people have fled the city. Likewise, administration officials continue to claim that killing civilians in Rafah is a “red line,” even as the IDF does this every day with impunity.

The Biden administration’s lying claims that no “major” operations are taking place in Rafah and that it opposes killing civilians are no more credible than Netanyahu’s attempt to present the bombing of the refugee camp in comments Monday as a “tragic mistake.” The fact of the matter is that as horrific as Sunday’s massacre was, it is part of a pattern of the systematic targeting of defenceless civilians by the IDF.

From the bombardment of the al-Ahli hospital killing upwards of 500 people, to the storming of the al-Shifa hospital, and the destruction of Khan Younis, millions of workers and young people know all too well the brutality of Netanyahu’s regime and what it is capable of with imperialist backing.

The imperialist governments in the United States and Germany, Israel’s two most important weapons’ suppliers, reiterated their backing for the Zionist regime after Sunday’s massacre. Adopting the Israeli government’s propaganda wholesale, White House National Security Council spokesperson John Kirby said, “Israel has a right to go after Hamas, and we all understand this strike killed two senior Hamas terrorists, who are responsible for attacks on Israeli civilians.”

Influential Iraqi Shiite cleric Moqtada Al Sadr has renewed his calls for the US embassy in Baghdad to be closed after an Israeli strike killed dozens of civilians in a camp in Gaza.

In a post on X, Mr Al Sadr condemned the attack and Washington's "shameless" support for the "genocide" he charged was under way in Gaza.

"I reiterate my demand to expel [the US ambassador] and close the embassy through diplomatic means without bloodshed," he said.


Gaza remains under assault. Day 235 of  the assault in the wave that began in October.  Binoy Kampmark (DISSIDENT VOICE) points out, "Bloodletting as form; murder as fashion.  The ongoing campaign in Gaza by Israel’s Defence Forces continues without stalling and restriction.  But the burgeoning number of corpses is starting to become a challenge for the propaganda outlets:  How to justify it?  Fortunately for Israel, the United States, its unqualified defender, is happy to provide cover for murder covered in the sheath of self-defence."   CNN has explained, "The Gaza Strip is 'the most dangerous place' in the world to be a child, according to the executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund."  ABC NEWS quotes UNICEF's December 9th statement, ""The Gaza Strip is the most dangerous place in the world to be a child. Scores of children are reportedly being killed and injured on a daily basis. Entire neighborhoods, where children used to play and go to school have been turned into stacks of rubble, with no life in them."  NBC NEWS notes, "Strong majorities of all voters in the U.S. disapprove of President Joe Biden’s handling of foreign policy and the Israel-Hamas war, according to the latest national NBC News poll. The erosion is most pronounced among Democrats, a majority of whom believe Israel has gone too far in its military action in Gaza."  The slaughter continues.  It has displaced over 1 million people per the US Congressional Research Service.  Jessica Corbett (COMMON DREAMS) points out, "Academics and legal experts around the world, including Holocaust scholars, have condemned the six-week Israeli assault of Gaza as genocide."   The death toll of Palestinians in Gaza is grows higher and higher.  United Nations Women noted, "More than 1.9 million people -- 85 per cent of the total population of Gaza -- have been displaced, including what UN Women estimates to be nearly 1 million women and girls. The entire population of Gaza -- roughly 2.2 million people -- are in crisis levels of acute food insecurity or worse."  THE NATIONAL notes, "Gaza death toll reaches 36,096, with 81,136 wounded."  Months ago,  AP  noted, "About 4,000 people are reported missing."  February 7th, Jeremy Scahill explained on DEMOCRACY NOW! that "there’s an estimated 7,000 or 8,000 Palestinians missing, many of them in graves that are the rubble of their former home."  February 5th, the United Nations' Phillipe Lazzarini Tweeted:

  




On bodies trapped under rubble, ALJAZEERA notes this morning:

We’re talking about a three-storey building that housed not only residents but also dozens of other displaced Palestinians in Rafah that made it to Nuseirat three days ago.

I met the neighbours. I met the family. I met one of the relatives of people still trapped under the rubble earlier today. They were telling me heartbreaking things.

Imagine escaping the air strikes in Rafah, looking for a safe space but being killed after three days of evacuating – not only being killed but being trapped where the Civil Defence teams do not have any equipment to remove or pull these people from under the rubble.

I saw Civil Defence teams doing their best to pull people from under the rubble. They were digging with their bare hands, with very basic tools. This was not the first time we have seen this scene. We have been seeing this for more than seven months now.

Unfortunately, it may come to a point where the Civil Defence teams will give up on this house because there are more people being targeted every single hour across the Gaza Strip.


April 11th, Sharon Zhang (TRUTHOUT) reported, "In addition to the over 34,000 Palestinians who have been counted as killed in Israel’s genocidal assault so far, there are 13,000 Palestinians in Gaza who are missing, a humanitarian aid group has estimated, either buried in rubble or mass graves or disappeared into Israeli prisons.  In a report released Thursday, Euro-Med Human Rights Monitor said that the estimate is based on initial reports and that the actual number of people missing is likely even higher."
 

As for the area itself?  Isabele Debre (AP) reveals, "Israel’s military offensive has turned much of northern Gaza into an uninhabitable moonscape. Whole neighborhoods have been erased. Homes, schools and hospitals have been blasted by airstrikes and scorched by tank fire. Some buildings are still standing, but most are battered shells."  Kieron Monks (I NEWS) reports, "More than 40 per cent of the buildings in northern Gaza have been damaged or destroyed, according to a new study of satellite imagery by US researchers Jamon Van Den Hoek from Oregon State University and Corey Scher at the City University of New York. The UN gave a figure of 45 per cent of housing destroyed or damaged across the strip in less than six weeks. The rate of destruction is among the highest of any conflict since the Second World War."


Lastly,  CNN notes, "Norway, Spain and Ireland will formally recognize a Palestinian state from today — a move that will bolster the global Palestinian cause but has further strained relations between Europe and Israel."



The following sites updated:





Saturday, May 25, 2024

Morgan Wallen article leads to an attack on SAVING COUNTRY MUSIC

First up, who knew so many Miss Marples and Easy Rawlins(es?) stopped by to read here.  A number of you e-mailed to note last week's "P Diddy" and Thursday's "Patti LaBelle, Chaka Khan, disgusting Diddy."  Yes, it was Chaka Khan that I wrote about in the first.  I've noted here before that I met her some time ago because she and C.I. are friends.  I think I wrote about an album she was trying to do a few years back and noted the recording playback I'd heard of it.


I left her nameless in the first post because it wasn't my story to tell.  But on Thursday, her daughter posted on Instagram about how evil P Diddy had been to Chaka.  So I wrote the second post.  But, yes, for all my Ellery Queens out there, Chaka was the friend C.I. was having lunch with when P Diddy walked up to the table and tried to talk to them and the two women iced him out and dismissed him.  And that's because he's garbage and trash who thinks he can get away with mistreating women.


Next up, I almost linked to an article in the last post.  I thought it was a reasoned assessment.  I didn't link to it.  I can't now.  The site that published it was under attack and the article is not currently available.  


Kyle “Trigger” Coroneos explains at SAVING COUNTRY MUSIC:

 

At 8:00 am Friday morning (5-24), Saving Country Music suffered a coordinated, targeted, malicious, and catastrophic cyberattack that made the website inaccessible for over six hours. In sixteen years of operation, and over 8,500 articles published, an attack of this size and scope has never been experienced by Saving Country Music, and the website has never been unavailable for as long of a period.

Cyberattacks and hacking attempts happen all of the time on websites, especially ones the size of Saving Country Music that sit in a Goldilocks zone of being big enough to be an enticing target, but small enough to not have a massive IT team to deal with such attacks. Luckily, Saving Country Music has never been a victim of such things previously, aside for passing and sporadic intermittent outages most users wouldn’t even notice.

What was the target of this cyberattack? It was an article published on May 22nd called “Country Music Has a Morgan Wallen Problem. It Is a Complex One.” The article was targeted in a large scale DDoS attack of a scale the individuals pressed into duty to help fight it claim they have rarely seen. Without getting too technical, DDoS attacks work to take down websites by sending them so many requests from so many different IP addresses, all the requests can’t be fulfilled, making the website inaccessible.

Even after blocking a total of 24,062 separate malicious IP addresses, the cyberattack continued. Eventually, it was brought under control by blocking access to the Morgan Wallen article being targeted. This had to be done through a 3rd party, since myself and my IT team had lost access to Saving Country Music ourselves. The article still remains unavailable as the cyberattack could very well be ongoing as we speak.


I'm not a big country music fan -- you can see my reviews and see that.  Not big on 'bro' country and the silencing of women, for example.  I've reviewed Dolly and Tanya and some other strong country artists including Chase Rice and Luke Bryan.  But SAVING COUNTRY MUSIC is site worth visiting for any music lover.  It's a little too even-handed at times, yes.  But they love music over there and they love writing about it.  


So I'm sorry that they got attacked.


You know my memory's awful but as I remember the article it was talking about how some were complaining that Morgan Wallen wasn't getting due recognition for his talent.  And the article was noting that his peers had been kind and recognized him but there was a line you walk up to and everybody's going to stop and pause.  Are you going to pull yourself back from that line or are you going to be an embarrassment to country music?  And that's why the industry is  not inviting him on currently to the various award shows to perform -- like the one that was on  AMAZON live a few days ago.


The chair throwing is not a minor thing.  He's very lucky that it didn't hit a person.  That was -- what, three stories that he threw it from? 


If he wants to sit in his living room and shoot up a TV like Elvis, go for it. But to be tossing a chair from three stories above?  No, get a grip on your impulse control.


And it's not his first problem or even his second problem.


Some are wanting to anoint him the savior of country music.  Maybe he will be some day but he's not that yet and what he's becoming is a threat to country music's image.  And that's why the industry's keeping him at arms length currently.


It was not an attack on Morgan.  I felt they went out of their way to bend over backwards and make sure that was not the case and were a little too generous with the praise.


And if that attack was done by Morgan's fans?


You're idiots.


Morgan's doing fine sales wise.  He doesn't need you attacking websites on his behalf.  All that does it turn people off.  It's like the Bey-hive.  Beyonce's over devoted fan base is another reason that she hasn't won the prestigious Album of the Year Grammy.  Hopefully, she will for COWBOY CARTER and she deserves it for that album.


But the Hive?  They turn more people off of Beyonce.  They can do good -- and did with that concert goer who was disabled and would have missed Beyonce live if the Hive hadn't gone into action.


But they have an image of being this testy and angry mob and that hurts Beyonce, it hurts how she's seen.  It turns people off.


Morgan is probably the best selling country artist in 2024.  These attack tactics will not help him but they will hurt him.  If that came from his fans, they need to back the hell off because their actions are the artist that they claim to love.

 
Closing with C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot:"

 

Friday, May 24, 2024.  As the assault on Gaza continues, the healthcare crisis worsens, the Israeli government sweats the soon to be released ruling from the International Court of Justice, students continue their activism calling for an end to the slaughter, and much more.


Mike Corder (AP) reports, "The top United Nations court is ruling Friday on an urgent plea by South Africa to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave.  Israel is unlikely to comply with any such order. Even so, a cease-fire order by judges of the International Court of Justice would heap more pressure on an increasingly isolated Israel as it continues its military assault on Gaza following the deadly Oct. 7 attacks by Hamas-led militants." Peter Beaumont and Robert Tait (GuARDIAN) add, "The latest legal moves come as Israeli media reported that Israel Defense Forces had concluded that troops had “breached regulations” when they killed a UN staff member and wounded a second one last week in Gaza when a marked UN vehicle was shelled and hit with a drone-dropped grenade."

This is the International Court of Justice -- the ICJ.  The Israeli government's actions have landed them in almost as much  legal trouble as Donald Trump -- give them time.  The body weighing arrest warrants against War Criminal Benjamin Netanyahu (among others) is the International Criminal Court.  

Again, give the government of Israel time for more charges to be filed against it.  There is also the ongoing abuse of prisoners.  Lorenzo Tondo and Quique Kierszenbaum (GUARDIAN) note:

Prisoners held at an Israeli detention camp in the Negev desert are being subjected to widespread physical and mental abuses, with at least one reported case of a man having his limb amputated as a result of injuries sustained from constant handcuffing, according to two whistleblowers who worked at the site.

The sources described harrowing treatment of detainees at the Israeli Sde Teiman camp, which holds Palestinians from Gaza and suspected Hamas militants, including inmates regularly being kept shackled to hospital beds, blindfolded and forced to wear nappies.

According to the two sources, the facility, located approximately 18 miles from the Gaza border, consists of two distinct sections: an enclosure where up to 200 Palestinian detainees from Gaza are confined under severe physical restrictions inside cages, and a field hospital where dozens of patients with war injuries are handcuffed to their beds and often deprived of pain relief.

One whistleblower, who has worked in the facility as a prison guard, said detainees were forced to stand up for hours, or to sit on their knees. The source, who spoke out at risk of reprisals, said several detainees were beaten with truncheons and not able to move their heads or to speak at the facility.


In addition, there may be charges for their failures of the government to protect its own citizens.  CNN notes, "The Israeli military has admitted it failed to defend its personnel on October 7 after a graphic video was released showing female soldiers from Israel's Nahal Oz military base being abducted during the Hamas attack."  Regardless of charges or verdicts, the Israeli government expresses defiance.  Chris Walker (TRUTHOUT) observes:

Israeli leaders are publicly stating that an impending ruling on Friday from the International Court of Justice (ICJ) will not have any impact on their plans to continue the government’s genocidal war on Gaza.

But in private, officials are worried that a ruling against Israel will come with immense political costs on the international stage.

The ICJ is set to rule in a decision regarding a request from South Africa last week to limit Israel’s imminent military offensive in Rafah, which technically already began earlier this month. The request from South Africa is part of its ongoing case accusing Israel of committing genocide in Gaza.

The ICJ has so far refused to rule that Israel has engaged in genocide or that it must halt its military operations. It did rule in January, however, that Israel must ensure its troops do not commit genocidal acts, and allow for more humanitarian aid to flow into Gaza — something Israel has refused to do.

South African officials claim the offensive in Rafah and other actions by Israel since the January verdict are destroying the “essential foundations of Palestinian life.” Indeed, in the months since the initial ICJ ruling, thousands more have been killed in Gaza, with aid groups expressing grave concern over famine taking over many parts of the region. Some health workers in Gaza are even reporting that many patients, lacking proper medical care and access to treatments, have maggot-infested wounds.


A genocide is taking place and eyes around the world are opening despite outright lies about what is taking place and despite big money being spent to promote lies.  Ari Paul (FAIR) reports:


An exposé by the Washington Post (5/16/24) showed the degree to which wealthy pro-Israel businesspeople coordinated with each other to pressure New York City Mayor Eric Adams to take drastic action against college campus protests against the genocide of Palestinians.

It’s a remarkable piece of reporting, by Hannah Natanson and Emmanuel Felton, that points to a pervasive problem in American politics: that the wealthy enjoy outsized influence with the political class, while the rest of us drift in the wind. 

The story is based on transcripts of a WhatsApp groupchat called “Israel Current Events,” whose participants included “billionaires and business titans.” One message by a billionaire’s staffer “told the others the goal of the group was to ‘change the narrative’ in favor of Israel,” the Post reported. A person identified only as “a staffer” told the group, “While Israel worked to ‘win the physical war,’ the chat group’s members would ‘help win the war’ of US public opinion by funding an information campaign against Hamas.”

he article reported that the chats revealed collaboration with Adams:

“He’s open to any ideas we have,” chat member [Joseph] Sitt, founder of the retail chain Ashley Stewart and the global real estate company Thor Equities, wrote April 27, the day after the group’s Zoom call with Adams. “As you saw he’s OK if we hire private investigators to then have his police force intel team work with them.”

The piece revealed that groupchat members, aware that “Columbia had to grant Adams permission before he could send city police to the campus,” strategized about how to apply the group’s “leverage” to Columbia president Minouche Shafik, including contacting the university’s board of trustees.

Needless to say, City Hall wasn’t too happy about the piece. One of the mayor’s deputies, Fabien Levy, quickly responded on Twitter (5/16/24) that “the insinuation that Jewish donors secretly plotted to influence government operations is an all-too-familiar antisemitic trope.” 

His multi-post thread concluded: 

@WashingtonPost & others can make editorial decisions to disagree with the decisions by universities to ask the NYPD to clear unlawful encampments on campuses, but saying Jews “wielded their money and power in an effort to shape American views” is offensive on so many levels.

The Washington Post, of course, did not report that “Jews” had “wielded their money and power”—but that “some prominent individuals” had, distinguished not by religion or ethnicity, but by their politics.

The mayor himself called the story “antisemitic in its core” (Good Day New York, 5/20/24) and doubled down on this point when speaking to reporters (New York Post, 5/21/24). The Anti-Defamation League (Twitter, 5/20/24) said that the Washington Post should be 

ashamed of publishing an article that unabashedly (and almost entirely on anonymous sources) plays into antisemitic tropes by inferring a secret cabal of Jews is using wealth & power to influence governments, the media, the business world & academia.

The Adams administration’s effort to redirect scrutiny away from the latest credible charge of coziness with wealthy donors found a friendly audience in right-wing media. Fox News (5/17/24) gave Levy’s claims headline status, and the New York Post editorial board (5/17/24) said that the Adams administration “smells a whiff of antisemitism in the WaPo report,” because “intimating that a mainly Jewish bunch of wealthy power-players were quietly pulling a politician’s strings is a classic trope of Jew-hate.”

Yes, that’s the same New York Post that obsessively ties every political cause to the left of Emperor Palpatine to the Jewish philanthropist George Soros (e.g., 8/1/22, 1/22/23, 1/25/23, 7/24/23, 12/9/23, 4/26/24, 4/26/24). It is also interesting to note that two Rupert Murdoch outlets, thought to be Republican stalwarts, are once again acting as in-kind public relations agents for a Democratic mayor, a testament to Adams’ right-wing agenda—the New York Post endorsed him (5/20/21) and continues to cheerlead for him (1/27/24) as he approaches the end of his first term. For the Murdoch empire, politics (including shielding Israel) sometimes comes before party. 

The accusation that the student protest movement against the genocide of Palestinians is “antisemitic” has become more and more tired. Many Jews are mobilizing in these protests (ABC, 4/24/24). As a result, many Jewish protesters face state violence (Al Jazeera, 5/3/24) and censorship (FAIR.org, 12/15/23) for speaking out against the Israeli military. Yet the Adams administration, Fox and the New York Post continue to hurl the insult, this time at the Washington Post, signaling that they have no more honest way to defend the behavior exposed by the Post.

Despite such smears and lies, students around the world have stood up.  Ethan Gudge and Phil Mercer-Kelly (BBC NEWS) report:

Sixteen protesters have been arrested after a University of Oxford building was locked down due to an occupation by a pro-Palestinian group.

Oxford Action for Palestine (OA4P) started a sit-in at university offices on Wellington Square at 08:00 BST, demanding a meeting over its policies relating to the Israel-Gaza conflict


Activists began the occupation and hung Palestinians flags outside of the university administration building as well as a banner of their demands for the university to divest.

A local activist told Socialist Worker, “Police then went to arrest all 16 of the students involved in the occupation, but students rallied outside the building. Around 350 students outside blocked all exits to the building, preventing police vans from leaving with the arrested students. It’s an incredible show of solidarity. It’s very militant.”

Students chanted, “Let them out,” and, “40,000 people dead and you’re arresting kids instead,”outside main entrance to Oxford university offices.

The police then tried to bring another van down the main road, but students sat down in front of the van, blocking it from moving. “Students are sitting in front and behind the van, it has been completely stopped,” the local activist said. 

The police forced their way through the crowd to the van with one arrested student just before 1pm. But protesters were undeterred. “Students have been here for over four hours and the chants and numbers are continuing,” said the local activist. 

A police van eventually got through the student blockade and police took all of the activists who began the occupation into police custody. “The students outside have now moved to picket the head of colleges conference that is happening nearby,” a local activist said.

“The students went in at 8am and the police got them out at 2:30pm. We didn’t get them released and it’s worth noting that the college authorities initiated the calling of the police.”

The rage of students across Britain shows no sign of fading. In Edinburgh, students have set up an encampment against the £55 million of investments the university has in companies that support the Israeli military or apartheid system.

Shea, an Edinburgh university student involved in the encampment, told Socialist Worker the encampment is trying to draw more people in. “The shift began on Monday,” he said. “On Tuesday, we had a stall and mass leafleting for a staff-student rally.

“There is a desire to grow the encampment. By being more outward facing we can get more students involved who haven’t yet been. And there has been discussion with staff about how to unite with them.”



Hundreds of graduates walked out in protest at Harvard University's commencement ceremony on Thursday in protest of the war in Gaza and the college's decision not to confer degrees on 13 pro-Palestine seniors.

Harvard's controversial decision to block the 13 seniors from graduating strengthened the intensity of Thursday's demonstration, which was "far larger, louder, and more extensive than graduation protests at any other university in the region thus far this spring," according toThe Boston Globe.

Many of the protesting graduates wore keffiyehs, waved Palestinian flags, and carried placards with messages such as "For Gaza." They chanted "Let them walk!" in support of the 13 students during the ceremony before marching out to a nearby church for what one organizer called the "peoples' commencement," the Globe reported.

Earlier:

Harvard University's board on Wednesday rejected a faculty vote to allow 13 seniors who had participated in a pro-Palestine encampment to graduate, provoking outrage from educators and students, some of whom protested outside the commencement ceremony Thursday morning.

The Wednesday announcement followed competing decisions by Harvard institutions in the days leading up to graduation. On May 18, the college's administrative board announced disciplinary actions against students—suspending five and placing more than 20 on probation—for their involvement in the on-campus encampment, which ended last week. This left the 13 seniors ineligible to graduate.

Professors in Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences responded on Monday by voting to amend the list of students receiving degrees to include the 13 students—effectively rejecting the administrative board's decision. Harvard's main governing board, known as the Corporation, had to make the final decision, which they announced in a statement on Wednesday:

Because the [13] students included as the result of Monday's amendment are not in good standing, we cannot responsibly vote to award them degrees at this time. In coming to this determination, we note that the express provisions of the Harvard College Student Handbook state that students who are not in good standing are not eligible for degrees. We also considered the inequity of exempting a particular group of students who are not in good standing from established rules, while other seniors with similar status for matters unrelated to Monday's faculty amendment would be unable to graduate.

Both faculty and students condemned the decision, which The Harvard Crimson called an "unprecedented veto" of the faculty.

"I would expect a faculty rebellion, possibly a faculty rebellion against the entire governance structure, because there's already a fair amount of mistrust toward the Corporation to begin with," government professor Steven Levitsky told the Crimson. 



Interim President Alan Garber was loudly booed as he opened the commencement, and he conceded that “some among us may choose to take the liberty of expressing themselves to draw attention to events unfolding in the wider world.”

The signal for the walkout was given by one of the three student speakers at the commencement, Shruthi Kumar, who deviated from the text of her address to pull a prepared statement out of the sleeves of her gown and read it. Kumar attacked the administration for its treatment of the anti-genocide protests, saying, “This semester our freedom of speech and our expressions of solidarity became punishable,” as students erupted in applause.

She said she wanted to honor “the 13 undergraduates in the class of 2024 who will not graduate today,” adding, “I am deeply disappointed by the intolerance for freedom of speech and the right to civil disobedience on campus … this is about civil rights and upholding democratic principles,” she said. 

Referring to the widespread support for the victimized students, she continued, “The students had spoken. The faculty had spoken. Harvard, do you hear us?” She then said she was walking in support of those denied their degrees. “These are my peers and friends, and I can’t in good conscience celebrate when their families are in pain,” she said. “This is beyond politics—it’s about civil rights and civil disobedience. We’re not intending to be disruptive or violent. But it’s making a statement, as a community, as the class of 2024.”

Some of the same democratic sentiments were voiced by the main commencement speaker, Maria Ressa, a Filipino journalist who won the Nobel Peace Prize for her exposures of corruption and state killings under the regime of President Rodrigo Duterte.

“The campus protests are testing everyone in America,” Ressa said. “Protests give voice; they shouldn’t be silenced.” She also noted that she herself had been falsely accused of antisemitism for her opposition to the Gaza genocide, saying she had been “called antisemitic by power and money because they want power and money.”

The commencement protest came despite a heavy presence of police on the campus. This was a manifestation at Harvard of the crackdown being carried out on virtually every college campus where students have demonstrated, set up encampments or occupied buildings to declare their opposition to the Israeli genocide in Gaza and demand their universities break all ties with the Zionist regime and divest any holdings in companies that supply Israel with war materiel.

The harshest such crackdown Thursday came at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where hundreds of police were mobilized in response to students who set up a new encampment at the school after the previous encampment was broken up by police earlier this month. While police broke up the new protest site, smashing through improvised barricades, students staged a second protest, taking over a building.

The attack on student protesters and their supporters is being driven from Washington, where both the Biden administration and Republicans and Democrats in Congress have sought to criminalize opposition to the Gaza genocide, declaring all criticism of the actions of Israel to be “antisemitic,” even though many of the protesters are themselves Jewish. More than 3,000 have been arrested for participating in the protests since they began last month.


Meanwhile, FRANCE 24 reports of Gaza today:


The ministry said Thursday afternoon that Al-Aqsa Martyrs Hospital in the central town of Deir al-Balah would have to stop operations within two hours. Later, after nightfall, the hospital appeared largely blacked out in Associated Press footage, although it was not clear if it had shut down.

The ministry said the hospital was currently treating more than 600 patients and wounded people and that some 650 other kidney dialysis patients rely on treatment there – warning that their lives could be threatened if the hospital closes.

Losing Al-Aqsa Martyrs Hospital would leave only two hospitals operating in Deir al-Balah, according to the U.N., at a time when the town has been flooded by Palestinians fleeing Rafah. Across Gaza, only about a third of its original 36 hospitals still function, and those only partially.



Al Aqsa Hospital in central Gaza has run out of fuel and its generators have stopped working, health authorities in the enclave warned.

Iyad Al Jabri, medical director at the hospital, said more than 4,000 litres of fuel was required each day to continue operations and care for patients.

“We have hundreds of patients, including the injured and those that are diagnosed with kidney failure and need electricity for their dialysis treatment,” Mr Al Jabri said.

“This will stop completely without any fuel."



The ongoing health crisis was discussed on yesterday's DEMOCRACY NOW!



AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman.

We turn now to look more at Gaza and Israel’s continuing targeting of medical facilities. Israeli forces have stormed Al-Awda Hospital in the Jabaliya refugee camp, forcing medical staff to abandon the hospital. The World Health Organization has issued an urgent appeal for Israel to protect medical staff and patients at the hospital. On Tuesday, three Israeli missiles struck the emergency department at Kamal Adwan Hospital in northern Gaza.

We’re joined now by Dr. Adam Hamawy. He’s a plastic surgeon, Army veteran from New Jersey, who just left Gaza, where he took part in a volunteer mission with the Palestinian American Medical Association. Dr. Hamawy and other volunteer doctors were trapped last week at European Hospital in Khan Younis due to Israel’s military offensive. Twenty years ago, in 2004, he saved the life of future Senator Tammy Duckworth of Illinois after she was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade while serving in the Iraq War, losing both her legs and partial use of her right arm. Dr. Hamawy is joining us now from Cairo, Egypt.

I’m glad we’re able to speak to you again, Dr. Hamawy. Can you talk about what happened in European Hospital, your response to what’s happening at Al-Awda Hospital, and how you made your way out?

DR. ADAM HAMAWY: Right now at the European Hospital, after we’ve left, people are afraid and are leaving. Even before we were preparing to go, in anticipation, staff members, people who lived inside the hospital for months now, doctors have been making their way out of the region and out from the hospital, after they’ve already evacuated other locations. Many of the physicians that I worked with and the staff had come here after working at places like Shifa and Nasser hospitals, and they expect the same to happen here, now that they’ve lost that sense of security of having an international presence there.

AMY GOODMAN: So, talk about your work there, the children and others who you saw, and why you decided to leave, and also Senator Duckworth’s help in this, and what you were demanding, because there was a time there that you were saying you would not leave Gaza unless you knew you could be replaced.

DR. ADAM HAMAWY: I think what we wanted, we were asking that we wanted a safe corridor for us to leave and for us to be replaced. That was an ask that we’ve always made. We came with the expectation that we would leave at some point and that other teams would come in. It was never a condition of our exit to have other people come in. It was an expectation. We did everything that we could do while we were there. We ran out of supplies. We ran out of support, as more and more people were leaving. And in the end, we could only do so much without having that replacement team come in.

Our team wanted to leave together, just like we came in together. When we were given the opportunity to leave as individual nations and only the Americans were given permission to leave, that was something that was unexpected. We never saw ourselves as coming in as individuals with certain passports. We came in as a team of humanitarian medical workers that are trying to help the people in Gaza. And when I stayed, I stayed because I would not leave my team behind, and the same with my colleagues who stayed with me. We would not leave until we were all guaranteed that safe exit. And so, when we were finally given that opportunity to go, we left.

And we still ask that the international community continue to, like, support the people. I’ve heard that President Biden has committed to the entry of humanitarian aid. And I would hope that, as a nation, we would stand by these commitments and that we would do everything that we can to replace us as soon as possible.

AMY GOODMAN: So, Dr. Hamawy, you wrote a letter to President Biden on May 19th, which Senator Tammy Duckworth delivered to the White House on the 20th, describing your experience and what you witnessed on the ground. In that letter, you wrote, “I have never in my career witnessed the level of atrocities and targeting of my medical colleagues as I have in Gaza.” Do you know who got that letter at the White House? Have you gotten a response from the president? And if you could describe in more detail what it was that you were referencing on the ground in Gaza?

DR. ADAM HAMAWY: I know the letter was delivered. I don’t know who — I did not receive a direct response from the president. But I know that he did receive it, and I’ve heard about that commitment.

What I was referring to is the targeting of doctors and nurses. While I was there, one of the doctors and nurses who lived close to the hospital were killed when their house was struck, as well as their family members, who were injured, killed and wounded. I worked with doctors who had fled other hospitals, like I said. They were targeted. I’ve talked to doctors and nurses who were taken as prisoners, interrogated and tortured. I know — I’ve visited other hospitals. I personally went to Nasser Hospital and saw what had happened there. I walked through the halls of an empty hospital that was vandalized, that had bloodstains on the walls and on the chairs and on the desks. That is what I’m referring to.

AMY GOODMAN: A new report by The Washington Post documents at least 90 cases of Israeli forces attacking hospitals in Gaza since October 7th, including on Al-Shifa Hospital, Nasser Hospital in Khan Younis. Of the 36 hospitals in Gaza attacked — tracked by the U.N. humanitarian office, only four have not been reported damaged by munitions. Can you talk about what it means to leave a hospital, what you were hearing from doctors who moved from other hospitals to where you were and then were moving on, and at the same time, this mass of humanity making their way away from Rafah, as they were told to leave, though they had — that was sometimes the third and fourth relocation of their families?

DR. ADAM HAMAWY: I worked with a nurse that I first met when I arrived there, for several days, and then I did not see him for about a week. When I saw him, I asked him where he had been. And he was relocating his family. His family lived in Rafah. They were given an evacuation order. And they went to one of the designated zones of safety, which was along the shore — basically, a desert. It’s got sand everywhere. It has no water. It has no electricity. It has no food and no shelter. They basically had bags that they carried with them. So, they did not have tents to set up. His wife and his two children — he had two girls, one that is 2 years old and one that is 3 months old. He had to try to get water for them. He went to a water station, where he stood for approximately eight hours, he described to me, before he was able to fill a jug of nondrinkable water. But that is what they used to drink. And this is an example of just one family. He came back to the hospital. He looked exhausted. He looked dehydrated. He broke down and cried while I spoke to him. And he spent two days in the hospital, then went back to his family. And he’s caught between trying to give aid, because, you know, his services are essential — a hospital cannot run on just a few doctors alone; it also needs nurses, it needs staff, and he was one of those essential staff — but he also had a family that he had to take care of. This is what one person is going through.

The hospital is emptying out, because many of them have done this several times. And the fear that they have is that as they leave — they’re taking care of people because they see themselves as the patients. They see their families. And many of them, almost all of them, have lost someone. So, when they’re taking care of the patients, they’re taking care of their families, they’re taking care of their neighbors, and they expect to be taken care of the same way when they get hurt, as well. And so, they are faced with this choice that, you know, is undescribable. How do you make that decision? And when we had to leave, we were faced with this choice, that is only a small — you know, it’s very small compared to what they’re facing. We had to leave our patients, just like they’re leaving their patients. And the hope is that this would end and they could all come back, resume a life that is a small semblance of normal, be able to take care of people, because that’s what they do, and to be able to take care of their families, as well.

AMY GOODMAN: Dr. Adam Hamawy, we thank you for spending this time with us. We have 10 seconds. What final message do you have as you’ve left Gaza and head back to New Jersey, where you work as a plastic surgeon and are an Army veteran?

DR. ADAM HAMAWY: Us leaving the hospital is not the end. We have to continue to try to help. There’s many people left behind, and we can’t leave them alone.

AMY GOODMAN: Dr. Adam Hamawy, we thank you so much for being with us. He has just evacuated from Gaza on Tuesday, where he had been volunteering with the Palestinian American Medical Association at European Hospital in Khan Younis, had been trapped on site along with other international medical workers, after Israel seized the Rafah crossing between Gaza and Egypt two weeks ago.

Next up, we speak with filmmaker Yance Ford about his new documentary, Power, about American policing. Back in 20 seconds.


Gaza remains under assault. Day 231 of  the assault in the wave that began in October.  Binoy Kampmark (DISSIDENT VOICE) points out, "Bloodletting as form; murder as fashion.  The ongoing campaign in Gaza by Israel’s Defence Forces continues without stalling and restriction.  But the burgeoning number of corpses is starting to become a challenge for the propaganda outlets:  How to justify it?  Fortunately for Israel, the United States, its unqualified defender, is happy to provide cover for murder covered in the sheath of self-defence."   CNN has explained, "The Gaza Strip is 'the most dangerous place' in the world to be a child, according to the executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund."  ABC NEWS quotes UNICEF's December 9th statement, ""The Gaza Strip is the most dangerous place in the world to be a child. Scores of children are reportedly being killed and injured on a daily basis. Entire neighborhoods, where children used to play and go to school have been turned into stacks of rubble, with no life in them."  NBC NEWS notes, "Strong majorities of all voters in the U.S. disapprove of President Joe Biden’s handling of foreign policy and the Israel-Hamas war, according to the latest national NBC News poll. The erosion is most pronounced among Democrats, a majority of whom believe Israel has gone too far in its military action in Gaza."  The slaughter continues.  It has displaced over 1 million people per the US Congressional Research Service.  Jessica Corbett (COMMON DREAMS) points out, "Academics and legal experts around the world, including Holocaust scholars, have condemned the six-week Israeli assault of Gaza as genocide."   The death toll of Palestinians in Gaza is grows higher and higher.  United Nations Women noted, "More than 1.9 million people -- 85 per cent of the total population of Gaza -- have been displaced, including what UN Women estimates to be nearly 1 million women and girls. The entire population of Gaza -- roughly 2.2 million people -- are in crisis levels of acute food insecurity or worse."  THE NATIONAL notes, "Gaza death toll reaches 35,800, with 80,011 wounded."  Months ago,  AP  noted, "About 4,000 people are reported missing."  February 7th, Jeremy Scahill explained on DEMOCRACY NOW! that "there’s an estimated 7,000 or 8,000 Palestinians missing, many of them in graves that are the rubble of their former home."  February 5th, the United Nations' Phillipe Lazzarini Tweeted:

  




On bodies trapped under rubble, ALJAZEERA notes this morning:

We’re talking about a three-storey building that housed not only residents but also dozens of other displaced Palestinians in Rafah that made it to Nuseirat three days ago.

I met the neighbours. I met the family. I met one of the relatives of people still trapped under the rubble earlier today. They were telling me heartbreaking things.

Imagine escaping the air strikes in Rafah, looking for a safe space but being killed after three days of evacuating – not only being killed but being trapped where the Civil Defence teams do not have any equipment to remove or pull these people from under the rubble.

I saw Civil Defence teams doing their best to pull people from under the rubble. They were digging with their bare hands, with very basic tools. This was not the first time we have seen this scene. We have been seeing this for more than seven months now.

Unfortunately, it may come to a point where the Civil Defence teams will give up on this house because there are more people being targeted every single hour across the Gaza Strip.


April 11th, Sharon Zhang (TRUTHOUT) reported, "In addition to the over 34,000 Palestinians who have been counted as killed in Israel’s genocidal assault so far, there are 13,000 Palestinians in Gaza who are missing, a humanitarian aid group has estimated, either buried in rubble or mass graves or disappeared into Israeli prisons.  In a report released Thursday, Euro-Med Human Rights Monitor said that the estimate is based on initial reports and that the actual number of people missing is likely even higher."
 

As for the area itself?  Isabele Debre (AP) reveals, "Israel’s military offensive has turned much of northern Gaza into an uninhabitable moonscape. Whole neighborhoods have been erased. Homes, schools and hospitals have been blasted by airstrikes and scorched by tank fire. Some buildings are still standing, but most are battered shells."  Kieron Monks (I NEWS) reports, "More than 40 per cent of the buildings in northern Gaza have been damaged or destroyed, according to a new study of satellite imagery by US researchers Jamon Van Den Hoek from Oregon State University and Corey Scher at the City University of New York. The UN gave a figure of 45 per cent of housing destroyed or damaged across the strip in less than six weeks. The rate of destruction is among the highest of any conflict since the Second World War."




The following sites updated: